Free pizza -- if you order en español

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June 4, 2012
By Shereen Marisol Meraji

Marketing expert Juan Tornoe says brands hungry to capture the Latino market should look to Pizza Patron and ignore brands like Purina -- the dog food company advertising a fiesta flavor.

    Juan Tornoe: They're saying how this food has all these Latino elements that will get your dog in the party mood, it's like, really?

Tornoe says Pizza Patron focuses on the hispanic market without patronizing -- and that's why it works.

He adds that he just might take part in tomorrow's free pizza offer.

    Tornoe: I'm gonna say 'quiero pizza porfavor' and I'm going to get a free pizza for my mom, she'll get a kick out of it.

Please listen to the whole story here:

 


Or visit Marketplace.org


'Sleeping giant' Latino vote yet to awaken

By Dave Schechter, CNN Senior National Editor
Wed May 30, 2012

Hdr-politics

Not one 'Latino vote'

Conventional wisdom lumps together "the Latino vote." But that community includes millions of people claiming dozens of countries of origin, speaking more than just Spanish. It is not now -- nor in the future -- likely to be anything so homogenous.

Juan Guillermo Tornoe, owner of Hispanic Trending Inc., a marketing and advertising firm in Austin, Texas, and author of the Hispanic Trending blog, is "counting the days" until he is eligible to become a U.S. citizen in a couple of years and vote in a presidential election.

For several years, Tornoe, a Guatemala native who came to the United States 10 years ago and now has permanent resident status, has talked about the nuances of the Latino community, the kinds of things companies marketing products (and political parties marketing candidates) need to know.

"There is not one Latino Vote; there is a multitude of Latino votes and candidates, society, and the media need to fully understand this if they are ever going to connect with the different parts of the Hispanic community," he advised.

Tornoe cringes "every time someone refers to Latinos as a unified voting bloc or as a homogeneous market segment. We are way too diverse for this."

"There are many differences between Hispanics, depending upon the person's country of origin or heritage: Food and music preferences as well as the holidays they celebrate are some of the most obvious," Tornoe says. "The actual words they use to describe persons, places, actions and things can vary immensely as well. There is also a lot of ideological baggage that comes along with one's country of origin/heritage."



As for generational differences, Tornoe said: "It is a completely different worldview depending how far away generationally Hispanics are from their country of origin/heritage.

"First-generation (foreign-born) Latinos have experienced life outside the U.S., have gone through the immigration experience, and to different degrees, have embraced or become acquainted with living in America. Second-generation Latinos encounter a mixed experience, being born and growing up in the United States, but brought up by immigrants and thus heavily exposed and influenced by their parents' culture.

"Finally, Latinos who are third generation and beyond are the sons and daughters of U.S.-born parents. They are very much influenced by the general market but still connect to their roots through the values, traditions and culture passed on by their parents and grandparents."

When it comes to citizenship, Tornoe, who hopes to be officially an American in three years, is clear.

"Being a U.S.-born citizen puts you in a completely different frame of mind than that of a naturalized U.S. citizen, someone who's a permanent resident (who could be counting the days to becoming a citizen or simply choosing to never become one), someone here on a temporary work visa or an undocumented alien," he said. "All of these are part of the Latino population, but only a percentage of them are able to vote.

"Then, among the latter, it is not the same to be able to vote, than to be a registered voter and actually cast your vote. Lack of participation in the democratic process is one of the major problems among the Hispanic community."

Read the entire article @ CNN


Hispanic Trending: Documenting Latino’s Imprint in America

Hispanic Trending’s New Slogan & Logo

By Juan Tornoe

As soon as landed in Austin to call it home I began experiencing for myself that many businesses had no clue how to cater to a multicultural customer base, let alone effectively reach them through marketing and advertising efforts.

The big Hispanic ad agencies were fiercely competing to call Fortune 500 companies their clients; some of them were actually doing a good job at helping businesses connect with Latino consumers. Still, there was a problem; most of the non-Fortune 500 companies, especially small to medium-sized ones remained mostly unaware on what they needed to understand in order to attract and retain Hispanic customers.

This was an opportunity I simply could not afford not pursuing.

By early May 2004, after some time of living in the U.S., I had a huge compilation of data building the strong case for any company to reach out to Hispanics, along with specific strategies on how to effectively connect with them and turn them into lifetime customers. My goal was to help my current clients, mostly small, owner-operated businesses spread across America, get a step ahead of their competition and capitalize in engaging with this growing demographic, the soon to become, largest minority in the nation.

My friend Dave Young strolled into my office and immediately inquired about the somewhat organized stacks of paper rising from my desk. After patiently listening to my explanation, he left the room with an almost unnoticeable grin in his face.

A few minutes later Dave stormed back into my office and literally dragged me into one of our conference rooms. It so happened that he had been fiddling with the idea of utilizing blogs as a cost-effective way to build a platform for his consulting business, and he had just setup juantornoe.blogs.com for me and wanted to share the basics on how to run it.  That’s how Hispanic Trending was born.

Almost 8 years have passed; the blog has gone through several changes, including various looks and feels, but for the most part, its logo had remained consistent.

For some time now, I’ve been feeling the need to update the logo and description to more clearly express the site’s intent. As you know, the urgent, unfortunately, sometimes takes precedent over what is important, and weeks, months, even years went by with all things remaining unchanged.

It wasn’t until very late last year, after hiring Rafael Picco as designer for Cultural Strategies, that I finally acted upon this desire. I sat down with Rafa and gave him a not so brief debriefing on Hispanic Trending and asked him to think about a new logo for it. Not too much time had passed when Rafa showed me his proposed concept.

Logo_Hand_RGB

It communicated so clearly what the blog was doing. It was a simple impression of a hand, but within it you clearly observed the map of Latin America, from Tierra de Fuego to Tijuana. It was one of those “Aha!” moments, the ones you don’t have that often.

Individuals with a Latino heritage are leaving a strong imprint in the United States of America, and Hispanic Trending has been documenting it for the last 8 years.

Hispanic Trending’s ultimate goal is helping businesses and individuals better understand the Latino community, its diversity and complexity. An integral part through this learning process is understanding how Hispanics are redefining the general market, how they are leaving an imprint in America.

Hispanic Trending will continue documenting this process, now with it’s new logo and slogan.

Thank you for your readership and support through this journey.

Sincerely,

Juan


Facebook ads can now be targeted to U.S. Latinos with new ethnic option

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“Latinos are much more social than their counterparts by nature,” says Juan Tornoe, CMO and partner of Cultural Strategies in Texas. “This is evidenced by the numbers of Latino bloggers out there. Twenty-one percent of all bloggers are Latino. We keep interacting like crazy online and we’re paying attention, so an intelligent advertiser says, ‘How am I going to connect with them?’”

Click here to read the entire article by Adrian Carrasquillo, published by NBC Latino on February 23, 2012.


Providing Access to Your Website's Spanish Language Content in a Subtle, yet Relevant Way

EnieWe have been working on a way to clearly, but un-intrusively, provide access to our client's online Spanish content. The "En Español" button or hyperlink is simply boring (and it disenfranchises a percentage of the site's visitors), the Flag - be it from Spain or Mexico - even though helpful, to a certain degree leaves out people from other nationalities/heritages.

So in this new world where Social Media is pervasive, we found a way to "stand in giant's shoulders" and take advantage of the ever-present icons leading people to a company's social media pages: Sneaking in between the facebooks and twitters of the world a little icon with a simple "ñ" - enie. If in doubt of what it means, whenever someone hovers over it, a little text message appears which reads "En Español". Click and estarás en el contenido en español del sitio web.


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Yes, the "ñ" is not exclusively used in Spanish but it has become a symbol that universally represents it.

Check our the unveiling of the Eñe Icon at our client's site: http://www.finishatut.org/ , The University of Texas System's new online bachelor's degree completion program.

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Internet Gold Rush

Thanks to Latino Magazine for including my "dos centavos" on an article on their latest issue!

Internet Gold Rush
By Kathy Adams

SanchezcoverWhether the Latino niche sites will survive is a matter of how unique and relevant they can be, said Juan Tornoe, founder of Hispanic Trending, a blog that tracks trends in Latino marketing and advertising.

“I think that they have to be something that is really, truly relevant, something that is not out there or not being offered by anyone in a better way,” he said. “Because just me going out there and saying, ‘Hey, I’m a Latino site, buy from me or read from me,” it’s not enough. You have to truly step out from the crowd.”

For example, “Why would Latinos subscribe to a Latino-only social networking site when they can use Facebook?” Tornoe asked. And Latinos don’t add the word Latino to their searches online, so Latino-centric sites have to feature content that will pop up in their results organically. “You have to really, truly be able to provide a product, a service, an experience that is not obviously Latino but takes into consideration the wants and needs of the Latino community,” Tornoe said.

While enthusiastic about their cause and optimistic about their viability, it’s too soon to tell which sites will succeed, especially for those still in the startup phase. Sites such as Descuento Libre may have a hard time being unique enough to compete, Tornoe said. Some have already dissolved, but sites such as NewsTaco seem compelling enough to endure.

“I think some of the big spur of Latino-centric sites will begin to fade,” [Tornoe] said. “The ones that have the stamina, have the staying power both emotionally and [financially] and are offering a needed product or service or source of information, they will remain.”

Click here to read the entire article.


The Subtleties Of Marketing Beer To Latinos

October 10, 2011
by Elizabeth Blair

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Any industry looking for major growth in the U.S. market can't ignore Latinos, who make up 16 percent of the U.S. population. As the Latino population grows, beer marketers are trying more nuanced ways of influencing this key segment.

"They love beer," says Jim Sabia, chief marketing officer for Crown Imports, which distributes Mexican beers including Corona and Modelo. "Hispanics are 19 percent more likely to purchase beer than the rest of U.S. consumers." On top of that, Hispanics will make up a large portion of the legal drinking age population in the future.

Mexican brands would seem to have a leg up with the Latino market. But Bud Light is their No. 1 beer of choice. Corona is No. 2. For the most part, the way all of the brands have tried to reach Latinos is through Spanish TV and radio, sponsorships of Major League Soccer events and concerts.

Juan Tornoe — whose favorite Mexican beer is Pacifico — is a marketing consultant based in Austin, Texas. Originally from Guatemala, he's watched the beer industry court Latinos for years, with mixed success. He points to a Corona campaign from 2008 called "Nuestro orgullo. Nuestra cerveza," or "Our pride. Our beer." Tornoe says it backfired.

"It makes sense for Mexicans, which is the largest percentage of Latinos living in the U.S., but if you're Puerto Rican or Salvadoran or Colombian, you're like, 'That's not my beer,'" he says.

Tornoe says it's important for advertisers to be aware of certain general cultural characteristics. "But don't overdo it. You don't have to make the culture the center of the show or be the spotlight of your ad," he says.

To reach bicultural Latinos, Tornoe tells his clients to treat them like you would the general U.S. market but give them subtle touchstones they might appreciate. He says Bud Light got it right with the 2007 Super Bowl commercials featuring comedian Carlos Mencia.

In one ad Mencia teaches a class of non-native English speakers from all over the world how to ask for a Bud Light. Tornoe says the commercials work because they're funny and because Latinos relate to Mencia "as a fellow Hispanic and relate to the experience of learning English." Also, they aired during the Super Bowl.

"It basically tells you, 'You understand that I am not glued to Spanish language TV all the time and I am not glued to soccer but that I actually enjoy watching the Super Bowl,'" Tornoe says.

The Latino population in the U.S. is so diverse, Sabia says, that it's broken into groups, and not necessarily by nationality. "We segment them by their attitudes as well as demographics," Sabia says. The segment names include "life indulgers" for Corona drinkers and "proud traditionalists" for Victoria.

Generational differences have influenced commercials for the Mexican beer Tecate, which is imported by Heineken. Felix Palau, vice president for Tecate's multicultural marketing, says until recently, the company's ads targeted only first-generation Mexicans, whom he calls the "newcomers."

"A consumer that has to work three jobs, who sends most of his earnings home to his family in Mexico. He's had a tough life," Palau says.

But he says many second- and third-generation Latinos would not relate to those ads. So now, instead of showing Latinos working at a restaurant, for example, the ads show them eating there. Palau says these ads show "a much more joyful, celebratory slice of life."

Source: NPR's Morning Edition